Posts Tagged "hiking"

Need sun? Climb a mountain.

Posted by on Oct 23, 2013 in Hiking | 0 comments

Lake Cushman, Olympic Peninsula, Washington

Lake Cushman, Olympic Peninsula, Washington

The fourth day of no sunshine and an open afternoon spelled one thing: H…I…K…E.

 

I left Olympia about noon; it was 53 degrees and cloudy. By the time I reached Hood Canal, approximately half way to the Mt. Ellinor trailhead, the clouds began to dissipate from above.

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The Most Fortunate Turkey Hunt…Ever

Posted by on Apr 29, 2013 in Feature Articles | 0 comments

I would never have imagined in a million years what I was about to see when I opened my eyes and lifted my head from that sunny boulder protruding from the earth on the side of that peaceful mountain. But I saw it. The image lasted a mere second in reality, but has been burned into my mind forever. From this season forward, I will never think of turkey hunting the same. If not for one small but significant piece of evidence, no one would ever have a reason to believe such a story. I still can hardly believe it myself, and I can’t get it out of my mind.

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Hiking Spider Lake

Posted by on Apr 15, 2013 in Hiking | 0 comments

Spider Lake, Washington

Spider Lake, Washington

Tucked in between a couple of evergreen-lined ridges, hidden in the foothills of the Olympic Mountains, sits pretty little Spider Lake. If you don’t know it’s there, you’ll most likely drive right by it. Around the perimeter of this modest aqua gem, a trail weaves in and out of the surrounding forest, offering a hike that is so technically easy that you could finish it in 20 minutes if you’d want to. But why in the world would you want to?

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Hiking Mt. Ellinor

Posted by on Dec 13, 2012 in Hiking | 0 comments

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAMt. Ellinor at 5944 ft.  Located on the Olympic Peninsula in western Washington, in the Olympic National Forest.

Being a flat-lander from Iowa, I was unprepared for this hike when a friend first told me about it nearly 12 years ago. It was July 4th when I reached the upper trailhead, roughly 2400 feet in elevation and 2 miles away from the summit. I thought no big deal, but I brought an extra t-shirt along with me just in case. To go with my shorts. Half-way up, near the treeline, I met a couple hikers coming off the mountain who looked like they had just descended Everest. Ice picks, crampons, goggles, expensive puffy jackets.”What are these guys training or something?” I asked myself. “It’s like 80 degrees in Olympia.”

About an hour later, I found myself in a steep snowfield that could cover dozens of football fields, forcing each toe into the icy mountain; gripping the side of the snowy hill with my naked hands like a scared little monkey.

My friend didn’t tell me there was snow up there…often all year around. He didn’t tell me they had just received several inches the night before. He didn’t tell me that I was going to slide off the precipice of an icy mountain to my certain death. Well, as convinced as I was, that luckily didn’t happen.

At the top, you are dealing with more snow, loose gravel, very steep terrain, rock outcroppings, and very possibly, wild Mt. Goats. There are several nice, flat areas at the very top, where you can lose track of time staring at the amazing vistas of snow-capped jagged peaks to the west and north, and river valleys and salt water ways to the south and east. And believe me, this makes it all worth while.

I’ve done this hike with my wife and middle-school kids in August several years back, knowing what to expect. Bring a lunch, a walking stick, two bottles of water, a light jacket and an extra warm shirt, along with the other hiking essentials, of course. Pay attention to the trail that lies ahead of you, be very deliberate about your foot placement near the top, and relax. Enjoy the ride!

Oh…the goats. Check with the nearest forest station before you go. At the time of this writing, the goats were considered a threat and the trail was closed. Seems silly to me, but I don’t make the rules.

DIRECTIONS:  From I-5 in Olympia, take US 101 north to Hoodsport. Turn left (west) onto State Route 119 and proceed 9.3 miles to a T intersection with Forest Road 24. Turn right onto graveled FR 24, proceed 1.6 miles, and turn left onto FR 2419. After 4.8 miles come to the lower trailhead. The upper trailhead can be reached by continuing on FR 2419 for 1.6 miles, where you turn left on FR 2419-014 and follow it 1 mile to the upper trailhead.

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Welcome!

Posted by on Dec 8, 2012 in The Great Outdoors | 0 comments

Welcome to ThierOutdoors! Hunting has been my lifelong passion, and bowhunting has surpassed my wildest dreams. When I can’t hunt, I enjoy hiking, biking, running, photography, writing, and promoting the outdoor experience.

My goal is to bring you gripping stories, amazing photos, and valuable information that reflect the appreciation and fascination that I and others have with that wonderful thing we call…the outdoors. I welcome you to subscribe to receive blog updates, so adventure will show up in your inbox. Welcome to your next adventure!

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